Commonwealth Games boxer charged over alleged role in massive meth-making operation

A professional boxer who represented Australia at the Commonwealth Games in 2018 has been charged for his alleged role in a massive methamphetamine operation.

Eleftherios ‘Terry’ Nickolas, 29, who lives in Sydney but travels to and from Adelaide, was arrested and charged on Tuesday by detectives working in Operation Ironside.

He previously finished fifth in the 69kg welterweight division at the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

Just two weeks ago, he was on the undercard for the blockbuster World Lightweight Championship fight between George Kambosos and Devin Haney.

Police say Nickolas is a member of the Comancheros motorcycle gang and helped other members obtain equipment used in the production of methamphetamine.

A court on Wednesday heard he faced new charges in Adelaide and Sydney after millions of intercepted messages from the encrypted AN0M app were analyzed. He will appear in court again next week.

Operation Ironside was Australia’s biggest organized crime case, leading to hundreds of arrests via AN0M, a Trojan horse app the underworld was tricked into using.

Eleftherios ‘Terry’ Nickolas previously finished fifth in the 69kg welterweight division at the 2018 Commonwealth Games, while representing Australia

Nickolas was arrested and charged Tuesday by detectives working in Operation Ironside.  Operation Ironside was Australia's biggest ever organized crime, leading to hundreds of arrests via AN0M, a Trojan horse app the underworld was tricked into using.

Nickolas was arrested and charged Tuesday by detectives working in Operation Ironside. Operation Ironside was Australia’s biggest ever organized crime, leading to hundreds of arrests via AN0M, a Trojan horse app the underworld was tricked into using.

Of more than 1,000 arrests worldwide, 383 took place in Australia and ranged from suspected mafia bosses and senior cyclists to airport workers and other insiders.

They were charged with 2,340 offenses in Australia while more than 6.3 tonnes of illicit drugs, 147 weapons and firearms and $55 million in cash were seized.

Among the arrests, 42 offenders charged under Operation Ironside have already pleaded guilty or been sentenced.

Nickolas is the 10th person charged after an industrial lab was discovered hidden in a house in suburban Adelaide in Morphett Vale on August 18, 2020.

The police found 11 kg of ephedrine, 16 kg of cutting agent, 8 kg of iodine, 238 g of methamphetamine and 5 kg of methamphetamine in the form of oil at home.

The members of the alleged The syndicate includes Apostle Broikos, a baby-faced 18-year-old with a private upbringing who faces life in prison.

Earlier this month it was revealed that the Trojan horse app used by cops to infiltrate some of the world’s most dangerous criminal gangs has led police to identify more than 5,000 members of the notorious Italian mafia, who all live in Australia to carry out their illegal activities. Company.

Australian Federal Police are investigating 51 Italian organized crime clans, including 14 of the infamous ‘Ndrangheta mafia, a year after their secret app AN0M helped them launch one of the biggest and most significant crackdowns on organized crime in history.

Apostle Broikos, 18, one of the youngest arrested in Operation Ironside, is believed to have been part of Nickolas' gang

Apostle Broikos, 18, one of the youngest arrested in Operation Ironside, is believed to have been part of Nickolas’ gang

Up to 5,000 Italian mafia members operate across Australia, Australian Federal Police say

Up to 5,000 Italian mafia members operate across Australia, Australian Federal Police say

The AFP have a full dossier on Mafia members living Down Under as part of Operation Ironside (pictured, one of the raids during the operation)

The AFP have a full dossier on Mafia members living Down Under as part of Operation Ironside (pictured, one of the raids during the operation)

AFP now has a comprehensive dossier on Mafia members living in Australia after last year’s Operation Ironside, which was largely built on data extracted from the encrypted AN0M app.

New South Wales is home to the largest number of Italian crime clans, three of which were found in Sydney and 14 are believed to have conducted their business in the New South Wales region.

There are 14 in Victoria, nine in South Australia, five in the ACT, four in Western Australia and two in Queensland.

Clans operate throughout the country and work closely with a wide range of organized crime groups, including outlaw bikers, Middle Eastern gangs, Asian triads and South American cartels.

Police are currently working with Colombian, American and Italian law enforcement in a desperate attempt to disrupt global Italian organized crime networks.

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